Categories

Journey of Recycling campaign launches

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority have today launched a new campaign which provides a unique and informative view of the journey of recycling across Liverpool City Region.

Through a newly created series of videos, residents from Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral can learn more about where their recycling goes once collected from kerbside, and how it is sorted for reprocessing and redistribution to the recycling markets.

Combined, the six districts of Liverpool City Region currently hold an average household recycling rate of 34.74%.

This figure provides a foundation to build from – however, the Authority recognises that collectively as a city region, we can do much better.

The Journey of Recycling campaign has therefore been launched to build trust in the recycling process and to remind residents how they can recycle right – all in a bid to boost recycling rates.

Lesley Worswick, Chief Executive of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority, said: “We all know how the simple act of placing items in our recycling collections can become ‘out of sight, out of mind’.

“That’s why, with the Journey of Recycling campaign, we are keen to give residents a behind-the-scenes insight which will equip them with more knowledge on how their recycling efforts can discourage unnecessary waste and make a real difference.

“In addition to displaying the sorting and end processes of each recyclable material, our suite of videos provides a reminder of what materials can be recycled in each of the districts and how to avoid recycling contamination.

“These are all important factors in ensuring that we recycle right.”

Cllr Catie Page, Chair of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority, said: “As an Authority, we are always keen to help residents understand that reducing the amount of stuff we buy – as well as repairing and reusing what we can – are great habits to adopt to protect our environment for current and future generations.

“However, we also know that recycling the materials we can in the correct manner also plays a key role in supporting this effort.

“If anyone is ever unsure about what they can recycle at home, we encourage you to watch our Journey of Recycling videos.

“Residents can also visit recycleright.org.uk, which is a really helpful resource that is full of information on what can be recycled at home and at our Household Waste Recycling Centres.”

To view the full suite of Journey Recycling videos, please visit https://recycleright.org.uk/do-it-right/journey-of-recycling/.

Residents across Liverpool City Region can also view the videos via the official Recycle Right FacebookInstagram and Twitter pages.

Categories

Huyton Household Waste Recycling Centre will be closed until further notice

NOTICE – Huyton Household Waste Recycling Centre will be closed until further notice. This is due to an incident in the area which is restricting access to the site. Thank you for your patience.

UPDATED: Friday 5th July 2024.

ENDS

Categories

Mersey community groups clinch £165,000 funding to help reduce waste

Sixteen community groups have been awarded a share of £165,000 to help the residents of Liverpool City Region reduce, reuse and recycle more.

The money has come from the Zero Waste Community Fund 2024/25, which supports local waste prevention, reuse and recycling initiatives. The Fund is arranged by Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority (MRWA) and Veolia.

Earlier this year the organisations had to bid for the funding which will give them the financial support to deliver waste-reducing behavioural change projects across the region.

Programmes include schools waste workshops, a repair cafe, cookery lessons to reduce food waste, clothes and textiles upcycling, a children’s toy lending library, restoration of unwanted furniture, food growing and community composting, amongst other things.

Chief Executive of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA), Lesley Worswick, said: “The Community Fund helps groups to become environmental stewards, creating a healthier place for everyone. Thankfully, our society is increasingly recognising the value in resources – they’re not just disposable items.

“The impressive ideas this year from local organisations are truly inspiring, and with 56 applications, the selection process was tough. Many past projects funded by the Community Fund have lasting benefits. They not only leave a positive legacy, but also continue to influence participants’ habits through ongoing activities.

“I wish all projects the best and look forward to seeing the impact they have.”

Project applications had to tackle one or more of the five priority household waste materials which have been identified by MRWA as key, namely Food, Furniture, Electricals, Plastics and Textiles. An analysis* of waste in the Liverpool City Region highlighted that a greater amount of these materials could be reused or recycled.

One project to previously clinch funding is the British Dietetic Association (BDA) who have been running food waste reduction and cookery skills programmes thanks to the Community Fund.

Suzanne Mitchell of the BDA said: “The opportunity to support a local community was a really powerful idea. We hope we’ve inspired households to think about new ways to save money by reducing the amount of food they throw away and growing their own produce.”

The successful organisations have got until March 2025 to deliver their projects.

ENDS

The successful projects:

Organisation and ProjectMaterial focusProject Summary
British Dietetic Association   Waste Warriors  FoodThis project will train up 17 ‘Leaders’ to support 12 Cooking Clubs. The programme will engage with 2,000 people face to face and will produce e-learning resources to prevent food wastage and food packaging, across home, school and public events. There will be resources, equipment and grants for clubs to deliver sessions focussing on cookery, growing and composting.  
Centre63   Centre63 Community Food & Recycle HubFood, Textiles and FurnitureCentre 63 will provide pantry use and food waste prevention training, as well as composting and growing food. They will also set up a sustainable shopping by Zero Waste lifestyle store, offering loose dry goods, organic options and plastic-free groceries on a not-for-profit basis. Monthly cooking sessions will be provided on how to eat healthily on a budget. Clothing swaps and upcycling/furniture restoration will also make up the project.  
Dovecot and Princess Drive Community Association   The Drive Repair CafeWEEE (electrical waste) & TextilesA local repair café will host experts including seamstress, electrician, clock repairer, cobbler and a joiner who will fix items free of charge.    
Friends of South Park   Compost Creators!FoodThis food growing and composting project will see household kitchen/food waste taken to a local park for composting. Food skills and cooking sessions will be delivered to local residents, who will also take part in food gleaning and seed saving.    
Gateway Collective   Gateway Craft CafeTextiles15 textiles repair and upcycling workshops supported by the ‘sew by lovely sisters’, held every two weeks termtime. Online access also available for further participants. Links to school and school inclusive hub for holiday children’s groups.  
The Let’s Cook Project   Let’s Cook More to Waste Less!FoodLet’s Cook will deliver cooking and food waste demonstrations in partnership with FareShare Community Food Members. A one day conference will launch the project with 100 attendees representing 50 engaged CFM clubs.  
Liverpool Lighthouse   Sew & Co  TextilesThe Anfield-based charity provides a sewing group that teaches sewing skills, including a focus on re-fashioning old worn and damaged clothes into new items and mending items, providing an alternative to ‘fast fashion’.    
Liverpool World Centre   The Great Schools Climate AssemblyEducationThis project will amplify young people’s voices on issues around waste, energy consumption and living sustainably, and bring them together with key local, regional and national stakeholders through the use of the Citizens Assembly model. Young people (aged 11- 18) taking part in the project will become ambassadors for change within their school.  
Mencap Liverpool and Sefton   Mencap Cottage – The Big Garden RevampFood, Furniture, TextilesWorking with people who have learning difficulties and people with mental health needs, Mencap Liverpool & Sefton will deliver Swap Shops, cookery and food waste reduction classes, as well as a Grow your own swap shops and a community garden upgrade using recycled and repurposed materials.  
North Birkenhead Development Trust   RefreshFurniture‘Refresh’ is a project that aims to establish a weekly drop-in upcycling session at the St James Centre on Laird Street. It will be a dedicated space for community members to learn new skills by upcycling furniture, either by bringing their own items, or utilising donated furniture.  
The Reader   Recalled to LifeFurnitureThe charity based in Calderstones Park will receive unwanted and donated furniture for restoration, whilst training and giving volunteers key upcycling skills and knowledge.    
Rule of Threes Arts Ltd   Rule of ThreesFood & WEEE (electrical waste)This food waste-based project will offer a kitchen equipment lending library, preserving jars, fruit press, cake tins and other food-saving items. It will also glean food from their community garden and offer practical skills in preparing, preserving, pickling, fermenting etc.  
Sustainable Starts CIC   Sustainable Starts Toy LibraryTextiles & ToysSustainable Starts CIC works with families to support and inspire them toward a more sustainable family life. We do this through Liverpool Cloth Nappy Library, children’s clothes swaps and a playgroup where families can explore sustainability with their children. The funding will be used to expand the lending Library with toys and baby items.  
Vibe Charitable Incorporated Organisation   Feed the NeedFoodVibe will distribute shopping lists, meal planning sheets and reusable containers as physical ways to support people to make improvements by careful planning to reduce overspending/shopping and utilising leftovers. The project will also produce an educational video of food saving and food challenges.  
Wirral Change   Second Stitch and Zero Waste PlateFood & TextilesSecond Stitch is about fixing, reusing, and transforming old clothes to fight against wasting fabrics. Wirral Change will also teach people from local ethnic minority communities how to make their clothes last longer and even turn them into something new through fun workshops.  
Wirral Environmental Network   Wirral Clothes Swap CafesTextilesWirral Environmental Network (WEN), Indigo Venue and Wirral community groups and organisations will reduce waste and promote sustainability through community-driven Clothes Swap Cafés at various locations across the Wirral. The Clothes Swap Cafes will be interspersed with workshops and activities focused on sustainable fashion and reuse.  

*Statistic from Merseyside and Halton Waste Composition Analysis 2021/22

Categories

Liverpool Half Marathon on SUNDAY 17th MARCH 2024

Liverpool Half Marathon on SUNDAY 17th MARCH 2024 – Restrictions to access at Otterspool Recycling Centre, Jericho Lane, Liverpool 

There will be restrictions to the access at the Otterspool Recycling Centre during the Liverpool Half Marathon on Sunday 17th March 2024.

Access to and from Jericho Lane / Aigburth Road will be restricted between 9.00am – 12.00pm as runners pass from Sefton Park to Otterspool Park via the underpass and then across the top of Jericho Lane. The junction will be open as soon as the last runner passes into Otterspool Park.

To avoid disruption:

  • Use Old Swan Recycling Centre, Cheadle Avenue, Old Swan, L13 3AF.

  • Access via the Riverside Drive approach, by proceeding along Aigburth Road, Park Road left into Parliament Street, left into Sefton Street.

The road closure at the junction of Aigburth Road and Jericho Lane will be reopened when the last runner passes or at approximately 12.00pm.

For more detailed information on the half marathon and road closures please go to: www.btrliverpool.com

For your nearest Recycling Centre click here.

Categories

£165,000 fund launched to help community groups reduce, reuse and recycle

A share of £165,000 is up for grabs to help community groups make the Liverpool City Region a cleaner and greener place.

The funding – made available via the Zero Waste Community Fund 2024/25 – is for community and voluntary groups, schools and not-for-profit organisations, who can reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource reuse and prevent carbon emissions.

There is up to £30,000 for projects which cover a minimum of four City Region districts, and between £1000 and £8,000 available for projects which work solely at one local authority level.

Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority (MRWA), Councillor Catie Page, said: “We are so grateful for the partnerships we have with the region’s community groups. They are the backbone of our communities, the ones who are working on the ground to make a difference.

“Giving groups the opportunity to get involved in looking after their environment brings benefits to all and can help us appreciate items as valuable resources rather than something which otherwise might be just thrown away.”

Bids must tackle one or more of the five priority household waste materials which have been identified by MRWA as key, namely WEEE (Waste Electrical & Electronic Equipment), Food, Textiles, Plastics and Furniture. An analysis* of waste in the region highlighted that a greater amount of these materials could be re-used or recycled. Projects can also include other household waste materials, for example paper or metals.

Previous Community Fund projects have included local recycling guidebooks, cookery clubs to support healthy eating and reduce food waste, fruit and veg gleaning, restoring old furniture to sell for charity and refurbishing unwanted rugs for resale.

One organisation to have previously received funding is Toxteth-based Liverpool World Centre, who have been running clothes and textiles waste education programmes throughout the region.

Jacquie Ayre, Global Learning Education Officer at Liverpool World Centre, said: “Our projects in the past and the current one ‘Re-think The Waste Revolution’ work closely with teachers and youth group leaders – supported by our partner Faiths4change – to give them the confidence, knowledge, understanding and skills needed to initiate conversations within  their settings.

“Currently we are supporting the creation of groups of young people to become peer led waste educators to deliver the rethinking waste message and engage with others to think critically about consumption. We anticipate these messages becoming more embedded in community and school settings and consequently behaviour around textile, food and electrical waste will start to change and waste will be reduced.”

A celebration event for the Community Fund was held on Tuesday 6th February, which brought together previous and current projects.

Interested groups can apply via www.merseysidewda.gov.uk.  

The deadline for submissions is 11.59pm on Sunday 10th March 2024.

Successful projects should receive the funding by mid April 2024 and will have to deliver their schemes by March 2025.

Organisations interested in this year’s Community Fund can:

  • Contact the Authority:

Community.fund@merseysidewda.gov.uk   

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS:

Sunday 10th March 2024, 11.59pm

ENDS

Categories

Birkenhead community organisation creating a buzz for furniture rescue and repair

A Wirral community organisation is using money received from an environmental fund to help stop furniture from going to waste.

Birkenhead-based Bee Wirral CIC has clinched £5760 from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority (MRWA) and Veolia Community Fund to help deliver the ‘Refresh: preloved furniture’ project. The money is being used to train up volunteers who can repair and refurbish unwanted furniture and pass it on to a new home.

The project is being run in conjunction with Wirral Council and local housing association, Magenta Living, who are supplying the furniture from their empty properties.

Lorraine Anderson, Director at Bee Wirral, said: “Refresh is all about reusing and recycling furniture and preventing it from going to waste. We are using the funding to deliver furniture cleaning, repair and restoration skills to our volunteers, teaching them how simple techniques such as painting, waxing, stencilling and decoupage can transform donated items. By undertaking some minor improvements unwanted furniture can be restored and repurposed to become a desirable item for a new home.”

The MRWA funding has enabled the recruitment of a driver’s mate and handyman, which is allowing Bee Wirral to pick up and deliver more furniture donations than they could previously. Families who need furniture liaise through Magenta Living and are able to choose restored items they need for their home.

As well as learning repair and refurbishment skills any volunteers recruited to assist with the Refresh project are included on the Bee Wirral staff and volunteer training programme where they receive first aid, safeguarding and employability skills teaching.

By the time the project has ended, Bee Wirral hope they will have saved 25 tonnes of material from going to waste, engaged with 100 people, and delivered 340 hours of training to 16 volunteers.

Lesley Worswick, Chief Executive of Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority, said: “We were really impressed with this project by Bee Wirral as we can give them the financial support to deliver a project where usable furniture doesn’t even make it into the waste stream but instead back into people’s homes. This is such a great scheme and I’d like to give everyone involved a huge thank you for their efforts.”

To get involved with Bee Wirral call 0151 647 7587 or email info@beewirral.co.uk.

ENDS

Notes to editors:
Image captions – images show volunteers for Bee Wirral’s Refresh Furniture project refurbishing furniture.

Established in 2013. Bee Wirral CIC is a lottery funded community centre, created to help bring a sense of community to Birkenhead. The organisation was called Birkenhead Early Excellence, which is where the name Bee comes from. www.beewirral.co.uk

The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 2023/24 has seen 13 community groups from Merseyside and Halton receive a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions. Funding total is £164,945.00

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste prevention and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

Categories

Community theatre waste project takes centre stage

A local charity theatre is celebrating a funding boost which they say will help cut waste and increase reuse and recycling.

Valley Community Theatre in Netherley, Liverpool, has been awarded £7977 to help deliver ‘Valley Vegheads’, a food growing and cookery skills project which it hopes will reduce food waste, increase composting and encourage food growing in the local community.

The money has come from the Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority & Veolia Community Fund 2023/24.

Martin Ball, Charity Director at Valley Community Theatre, said: “We are using the funding to bring in an extra pair of hands. This means that we have more resource to help create  a community kitchen garden at our premises on Childwall Valley Road, allowing us to run gardening activities and host community swap shops. Our recycling of waste products from the garden and cafe and our textiles ‘Swap Shop’ will serve as an education for all in reducing waste and will impact positively on the environment.”

The project launched in the summer and is hoping to cut waste by:

  • Creating a community kitchen garden that supports and provides food for free school meals during the theatre’s Holiday Activities Food club.
  • Hosting gardening activities, composting, growing vegetables and using harvested foods in the theatre’s café.
  • Increasing the recycling of items from the theatre café (including aluminium cans, cardboard, plastics, paper, glass) which serves audiences attending performances throughout the year.
  • Running six community ‘Swap Shop’ for clothes and textiles including unwanted school uniforms.

By the end of the project the theatre hopes they will have engaged with up to 4000 people and stopped over 16 tonnes of material from going to waste.

Martin Ball continued: “The vegetable growing part of the project will ensure more children, young people and wider community members have access to the fresh food we produce. Helping young people understand why we can’t grow bananas, or that potatoes grow underground, gives them a greater appreciation of where our food comes from and what’s involved in producing it.

“The nutrition and education part of the process will be incorporated into our Holiday Activities With Food programmes. All our participants and visitors will also benefit from the transformation of an otherwise overlooked outside space which will now offer a place to sit and appreciate the enhanced grounds, learn about the growing of different fruits and vegetables and serve as a place of discovery.”

Lesley Worswick, Chief Executive of Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority, said: “Wasted food is a huge issue for society and for the environment. The numbers show that eight meals could be saved each week if we stopped binning our food at home. Projects like this one are crucial in delivering useful information to residents and helping make positive changes in behaviour. We’re looking forward to seeing how it develops.”

ENDS

Categories

Bootle charity on a mission to rescue unwanted textiles

A charity in Bootle has made it their mission to stop textiles from being thrown away – and has received a financial funding boost to help them in their efforts.

The Repurpose Project: Breathing New Life into Old Textiles is the creation of The Venus Charity, a Bootle-based community group who help to empower, promote and support women, young women and their children. The resource-rescuing project has been awarded £3500 from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund, which helps local groups to reduce waste and increase recycling and reuse.

Venus have run a pop-up shop in the Bootle Strand shopping centre to deliver upcycling textiles workshops within the shop space. More follow-on sessions have been delivered from The Venus Centre in Bootle.

Sue Potts, Chief Executive of Venus, said: “The Repurpose Project is aiming to prevent waste and increase the amount of materials available for reuse and recycling by upcycling old textiles. We’re hoping to raise awareness about the importance of sustainable practices, and to provide a creative and accessible way for members of our community to engage with these practices. By using these materials we can prevent them from going to waste and instead give them a new lease of life.”

Venus have been working with partner organisations to source materials which can then be creatively repurposed. The workshops – led by artist Emma Summerscales – are providing an anticipated 50 participants with the skills and knowledge they need to upcycle textiles, whilst preventing up to one tonne of materials from going to waste.

Venus have also developed an educational booklet that is being distributed to participants during the sessions, providing them with step-by-step instructions on how to upcycle and repair their textiles. Short educational presentations are being shown at each session which covers topics such as the environmental impact of textile waste, the benefits of upcycling, and the basics of textile repair. These presentations are interactive and designed to engage participants and encourage them to ask questions and share their own experiences.

Lesley Worswick, Chief Executive of Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority, said: “According to research* around 5% of household bins locally contain textiles such as clothes and shoes, a lot of which could still be used. The Repurpose Project can help stop those items from being thrown away, can stop resources from going to waste, whilst also engaging with the local community and spread the message about sustainability in a practical way.”

Sue Potts continued: “We believe that by directly engaging with residents we can build a stronger relationship and foster a sense of community ownership and involvement in our project. This will not only benefit the success of our project and the environment, but also have a positive impact on the local community as a whole.”

A project celebration event was recently held at the Venus Centre (Thursday 30th November, 2023) which brought together organisers, participants and partners.

ENDS

Notes to editors:

  • *Statistic from Merseyside and Halton Waste Composition Analysis 2021/22. https://www.zerowastelcr.com/liverpool-city-region-waste-composition-analysis-2021/
  • Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.
  • The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 2023/24 has seen 13 community groups from Merseyside and Halton receive a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions. Funding total is £164,945.00
Categories

Residents being encouraged to ‘choose to reuse’ this Christmas

A MRWA staff member discussing the Choose to Reuse campaign at Gillmoss Recycling Discovery Centre.
A MRWA staff member discussing the Choose to Reuse campaign at during a Sustainable Christmas Market at Veolia’s Recycling Discovery Centre in Gillmoss.

Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority has launched a Christmas campaign advising residents to ‘choose to reuse’, in a bid to tackle climate change.

Along with reuse tips, the campaign – which is being driven through the Authority’s Zero Waste LCR branch – offers other sustainable guidelines, which can help people to save money while protecting the environment.

According to national data from the Environment Agency, around 30% more waste is generated at Christmas time.

Further astonishing figures state that an estimated 50,000 trees are cut down to create enough paper to wrap presents, while over 1 billion Christmas cards are thrown away per year.

The above stats form part of a wider waste problem that negatively impacts climate change during the festive season.

Although larger generation of waste during Christmas time is a widespread issue, Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority is keen to buck the trend.

Reaction

Lesley Worswick, Chief Executive of Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority, said:

“The aim of our ‘Choose to Reuse’ campaign is simple; to help residents reduce waste, save money and protect the planet for future generations… All in a way which doesn’t compromise the joys of Christmas.

“We’ve created a dedicated blog series which offers sustainable advice on everything from Christmas trees and decorations to cards, wrapping paper and gifts.

“Even if residents try one or two of the tips on offer, every little step towards reducing waste is a big stride towards protecting the environment.”

Cllr Catie Page, Chair of Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority, said:

“Often, planning goes out the window and leaves us in a rush to choose the quick and convenient option when Christmas shopping… Then, before we know it, it’s all over!

“While the primary aim is to make Liverpool City Region more sustainable, the ‘Choose to Reuse’ campaign also gives people a chance to think again.

“We want to provide plenty of inspiration for residents and their loved ones to embrace creativity and build precious festive memories together in the process.”

More information is available at https://www.zerowastelcr.com/blog/choose-to-reuse-this-christmas/.

-ENDS- 

NOTES TO EDITORS

  • Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens, Wirral and also Halton. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents and operates (via a contract with resource management company Veolia) 16 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRC’s) for householders in the Merseyside and Halton area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste. For more information, please visit https://www.merseysidewda.gov.uk/.
  •  
  • Zero Waste Liverpool City Region is brought to you by Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority (MRWA). The main aim of Zero Waste LCR is to work towards both MRWA’s own Corporate Plan and the Liverpool City Region Combined Authority’s commitment to Net Zero by 2040. Waste and resources play an important part in reaching this target, in combating the effects of climate change, and we also believe that we must adopt a zero waste circular economy to ensure that resources are used for longer and carbon emissions are prevented. Premature disposal of resources means that the full extent of their value is not maximised for the local economy. For more information, please visit https://www.zerowastelcr.com/.
  •  
  • The featured photographs were taken at Veolia’s Sustainable Christmas Market, which took place at the Recycling Discovery Centre in Gillmoss on Saturday 25 November. Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority (MRWA) attended the event to launch the Zero Waste LCR ‘Choose to Reuse’ campaign. More images are available to download via Google Drive. Image credits: David Jones Photography.
  •  
  • #ChooseToReuse campaign assets and suggested messaging are available to download here.
  • Media Enquiries

    Members of the media, for more information please contact:

    Adam de Spretter Yates | Communications and Development Officer |1 Mann Island, Liverpool, L3 1BP | 07976730362 | adam.despretteryates@merseysidewda.gov.ukDisclaimer: Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority

    Categories

    The Baltic Triangle swap shop saving textiles from trash

    An environmental project in the Baltic Triangle area of Liverpool has been helping to rescue and reuse unwanted clothes and textiles.

    The Baltic Triangle Area C.I.C. used funding from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund to run the Baltic Swap Shop project, with the aim of stopping clothes and textiles from going to waste.

    The community-based initiative has been delivered by the C.I.C. to reduce waste, increase the availability of materials for reuse and recycling, and promote a sustainable and ethical approach to fashion consumption.

    According to a recent analysis* around 5% of household bins locally contained textiles such as clothes and shoes, a lot of which could still be used. The same report showed that plastic items made up 11.9% of Merseyside and Halton’s kerbside residual (i.e. black bin bag) waste.

    Alex Keyter, Project Lead at the Baltic Triangle Area C.I.C., said: “Textiles is one of the largest contributors to global waste and pollution, producing 92 million tonnes of waste each year and accounting for 10% of global carbon emissions. Fast fashion exacerbates this problem by promoting a culture of disposable clothing. We’re hoping we’ve helped address this issue by hosting Swap Shop Clothing Exchange events and engaging the diverse community of Liverpool in a fun, inclusive, and accessible way.

    “The primary focus of the project has been to encourage people to consume less, reduce their environmental impact, and reuse materials that would otherwise be discarded. We hope we’ve helped to foster that sense of community and camaraderie in the Baltic Triangle area.”

    The project has set out to collaborate with local businesses, schools and community organisations to raise awareness and encourage participation in the Swap Shop events. Baltic Triangle Area C.I.C. hope these networks and resources will help raise awareness of the issues in waste within the community.

    Lesley Worswick, Chief Executive of Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority, said: “Our Community Fund projects are always full of inspirational ideas. Local organisations such as Baltic Triangle Area C.I.C. can deliver zero waste and sustainability messages and ideas in a way that people can relate to in their own lives, which is a huge benefit to the local environment.”

    Alex Keyter continued: “By promoting a more sustainable approach to fashion consumption we hope this project has helped contribute to a cleaner and more sustainable future for the Baltic Triangle area and encourages the community to adopt environmentally and sustainable responsible practices.

    “Aside from the waste prevention element, the project has provided a platform for volunteers to gain valuable skills in event management and social media marketing. These skills can enhance their employability, contributing to the local economy by preparing them for future career opportunities.”

    ENDS

    Notes to editors:

    • Pictures attached show Baltic Triangle Area C.I.C. clothes Swap Shop, 7th October 2023, Liverpool
    • *Statistic from Merseyside and Halton Waste Composition Analysis 2021/22
    • Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens, Wirral and also Halton. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents and operates (via a contract with resource management company Veolia) 16 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRC’s) for householders in the Merseyside and Halton area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.
    • The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 2023/24 has seen 13 community groups from Merseyside and Halton receive a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions. Funding total is £164,945.00

    Members of the media for more information please contact:

    John Lally | Communications and Development Officer

    Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority | 1 Mann Island, Liverpool, L3 1BP

    Office: 0151 255 2568 | Email: john.lally@merseysidewda.gov.uk