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Merseyside community groups come together to help reduce waste

Seventeen community groups have met in Liverpool to come up with ideas to help the City Region reduce, re-use and recycle more.

The groups have all received funding from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority (MRWA) and Veolia Community Fund 21/22, which has distributed £165,000 to help support local waste prevention, re-use and recycling initiatives.

Due to the Covid pandemic this is the first time that representatives from the organisations have been able to come together in person to discuss their plans to help cut household waste levels. The conference took place last Tuesday 14th September at No.1 Mann Island, the office of MRWA.

The organisations had to bid for the funding which will give them the financial resources to deliver waste-reducing behavioural change projects across the region. Programmes include cookery clubs to reduce food waste, community recycling hubs, sewing classes and craft clubs, upcycling and restoration of unwanted furniture, clothes recycling, and a cloth nappy lending library.

Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA), Councillor Tony Concepcion, said: “The event was a great opportunity to meet all our project partners. Year on year we’re seeing more success from our Community Fund programme and its influence on the whole region. This year there are a wide range of projects and a good mix of materials including food, furniture, plastics and textiles.

“The work of these groups is greatly appreciated, and we know the benefits go well beyond just managing waste. It’s been a tough 18 months for everybody, but hopefully the Community Fund can give local groups the opportunity to show that many of the things we put in the bin are actually valuable resources and not something which might be just thrown away.”

One of this year’s projects is being delivered by local charity Bridge2 whose remit is to welcome, serve, and assist asylum seekers, refugees, and local community throughout the central Liverpool area. Their ‘Reimgaine’ project will see textiles and furniture collected and donated to support vulnerable communities, furniture reuse courses and textile reuse workshops.

Lindsay Thomas, Community Arts Co-ordinator at Bridge 2, said: “It was wonderful to see all the community partners together in one place, as it gave us the chance to swap ideas and discuss how we can all work together to help local residents reduce waste and reuse what they can.”

The successful organisations have got until March 2022 to deliver their projects.

ENDS

Note to editors
– Image caption
MRWA_CF2021 – MRWA Community Fund projects event, 14 September 2021, with MRWA Chairperson Councillor Tony Concepcion (far right)
MRWA_CF2021A – (L TO R) MRWA Community Fund Officer Christine O’Brien with Lindsay Thomas and Justin Thomas of Bridge2

– The successful projects:

Big Help Project – No Waste Food Club: this will set up six new Community Food Partnerships to reduce food wastage, aiming for 200 new members per Partnership. Will also include access to other services such as debt advice, housing support, employability, skills training.

The Bread Streets Group – Waste Not, Want Not: this Liverpool-based project will hold six workshops on how to reduce and reuse food, plastics and clothes/textiles, plus a litter pick.

Bridge2 – Reimagine: this project will see textiles and furniture collected and donated to support vulnerable communities, three furniture reuse courses and four textile reuse workshops.

Brunswick Youth & Community Centre – Make a Meal of it: this project in Sefton will host 10 weekly food skills training sessions with local families. They will be taught how to grow their own produce, use leftover, cook on a budget and how to freeze food correctly.

Carmel Sixth Form College – Sustainable Steps Toward Sustainability: the College will hold 26 weekly workshops and events for students on how to reuse furniture, textiles and food growing.

Centre 63 – Remake Yourself Hub: this ongoing programme will continue to provide sewing classes and upcycling furniture workshops while supporting the skill development of young women. It will concentrate on unwanted furniture and textiles and the Centre 63 youth club will be focused on litter picking, repair workshops and food waste activities.

Changing Communities CIC – ReStore St Helens: the reuse and recycle shop in Sutton will host a series of furniture upcycling workshops, offer donations to local vulnerable residents and set up seven school reading corners.

Community Integrated Care – Sustainability in Social Care: CIC will establish five new community collection hubs, host waste reduction and re-use events (for example, textile & furniture swapping and food waste avoidance workshops) and look to reuse materials within the social care sector. They will also create a full-time waste prevention specialist and part-time food waste avoidance champion while supporting 20 volunteers, giving opportunities for people with care and support needs.

Dovecot and Princess Drive Community Association – Recycle, Refashion, ReCreate: includes clothes/textiles and food workshops to be held in local schools, five family food workshops, 13 sewing in the community sessions, seven re-fashioning sessions and a fashion show and recycling competition.

Farm Urban – Future Food Heroes: working with six primary schools this project will set up a food ecosystem in each class and help create future food ambassadors.

Halton Play Council – Make Use and Lend Halton: the Runcorn-based charity will use the funding to host 10 reuse & repair craft workshops, four swishing and textiles sales events, as well as collecting textiles for redistribution and a toy lending library.

Liverpool Cloth Nappy Library – Sustainable Starts: will look to reduce plastic pollution through a lending library which will provide a reusable nappy kit and advice to parents. Will look to engage with 50 families as well as host three community pop-up events.

Liverpool Lighthouse – Liverpool Re-Fashion: this will see 26 weekly refashioning workshops help, three enterprise workshops and an exhibition at a fashion show.

Liverpool World Centre – Fashion Fix: a clothes/textiles project for schools, trainee teachers and parents, engaging with 4,000 people. LWC will create 20 Fashion Fixers and Climate Champions to help raise awareness and influence reuse, recycling of textiles and reduction of textile waste.

Make It Happen Birkenhead Ltd – Textiles as treasure: Make It Happen will employ a Textiles Champion to help establish a Community Shop, host 22 training sessions in sewing and crafts and sell the items in the shop.

Pioneer People Wirral – Street Ahead: this scheme will host a variety of neighbourhood exchange/garage sale events and 12 community centre events with donated items and upcycled items made by the Shed Heads project. Will also offer bikes refurbished at Liverpool Prison and send tools and clothes to Gambia to support local enterprise.

Wirral Change Ltd – Repaired Again: this project will work with ethnic communities to hold 20 food waste workshops, 20 textiles upcycling sewing classes and three community events.

– Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

– The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 2021/22 has seen 17 community groups from Merseyside and Halton receive a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions. Funding total is £164,999.38

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Pringles tubes and other paper containers with metal ends now accepted at Merseyside recycling Bring Banks

A new recycling service for paper containers with metal ends, such as Pringles tubes, hot chocolate, nuts and other products, has been launched at Merseyside’s 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs) this Recycle Week.

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority has introduced the service in partnership with Veolia and the Alliance for Beverage Cartons & the Environment (ACE UK).

Local residents can now recycle their containers alongside food and drink cartons via specialist bring banks located at HWRCs throughout the region.

The new service is the result of an agreement between ACE UK, which operates the dedicated food and drink carton recycling service, and packaging manufacturer Sonoco Consumer Products Europe.

Councillor Tony Concepcion, Chairperson of MRWA, said: “Previously, paper containers with metal ends – such as Pringles tubes – could not be recycled in our region, but we were keen to take this opportunity to include them. Merseyside residents have always responded well to the different schemes we’ve implemented at our HWRCs, and we hope that they will take full advantage of this new service.”

Michael Wake, Contract Manager at Veolia, added: “We’re delighted to be expanding the types of materials that are accepted at Recycling Centres in Merseyside. Recycling is a great example of how you can make small changes to contribute to a greener environment, by keeping materials in the loop and preserving raw materials.”

Richard Hands, CEO of ACE UK, said: “ACE UK has been successfully running the industry’s recycling programme for the last 15 years, driving significant increases in carton recycling as part of its role as the UK’s food and drink carton industry trade body. We have worked closely with local authorities and waste management companies so that today 93% of local authorities collect food and drink cartons for recycling through either Bring Banks or kerbside collection.”

Helen Potter, sustainability commercial lead for Kellogg’s owned Pringles ,said: “We know that people want to recycle their Pringles tubes. Including a solution for Pringles in the Bring Banks scheme will allow our consumers to return them to be recycled into something new and is an important interim solution as we work towards the development of our new tube. At Kellogg, we’re committed to making all of our packaging recyclable, reusable, or compostable by the end of 2025. This is another important step on this journey.”

Material collected from the Bring Banks is sent to ACE UK’s Stainland recycling facility in West Yorkshire, which is run by Sonoco Alcore. Fibre from the recycled cartons is fed directly into Sonoco Alcore’s paper mill on the same site, to be turned into industrial coreboard.

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Notes to Editors:

The attached pictures show:

MRWA_ACEUK1 – (l to r) Michael Wake, Veolia Contract Manager, and Carl Beer, MRWA Chief Executive, at Kirkby HWRC.

MRWA_ACEUK2 – A new recycling service for paper containers with metal ends, such as Pringles tubes, has been launched at Merseyside’s 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres.

Paper containers with metal ends can be recycled at the following locations:

Knowsley

Huyton – Wilson Road – L36 6AD
Kirkby – Depot Road, Knowsley Industrial Park – L33 3AR

Liverpool

Old Swan – Cheadle Avenue – L13 3AF
Otterspool – Jericho Lane, Aigburth – L17 5AR

 Sefton

Formby – Altcar Road, Formby – L37 8EG
Sefton Meadows – Sefton Lane, Maghull – L31 8BX
Southport – Foul Lane, Scarisbrick New Road – PR9 7RG
South Sefton – Irlam Road, Bootle – L20 4AE

 St Helens

Newton-le-Willows – Junction Lane – WA12 8DN
Rainhill – Tasker Terrace, Rainhill – L35 4NX
Ravenhead – Burtonhead Road, St. Helens – WA9 5EA

Wirral

Bidston – Wallasey Bridge Road, Birkenhead – CH41 1EB
Clatterbridge – Mount Road, Clatterbridge – CH63 4JZ
West Kirby – Greenbank Road – CH48 5HR

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Recycle Week 2021: This year ‘Step It Up’ in the fight against Climate Change!

Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA) is proud to ‘Step It Up’ in the biggest and best Recycle Week ever.

Recycle Now and MRWA are asking residents to ‘Step It Up’ in the fight against climate change and take action to protect our environment through even better recycling habits.

This year Recycle Now welcomes a celebrity ambassador to front Recycle Week and is delighted to be working with TV Presenter, Invictus Games Medalist and Strictly Come Dancing Star JJ Chalmers for the national campaign.

JJ is a keen environmentalist and is partnering with Recycle Now to inspire the nation to ‘Step It Up’ in the fight against climate change. JJ Chalmers said, “I’m thrilled to be part of this year’s campaign. I’m passionate about the environment and how we can battle climate change. I am delighted to be working with the Recycle Now team on what has become a really important week of action across the UK. I really want to encourage people to look at what they are doing and how they can ‘Step It Up’ and do even more… even better.”

Recycle Now and MRWA are asking the nation to ‘Step It Up’ and perfect our recycling habits.

Getting recycling right

Latest research from Recycle Now reveals that almost 9 out of 10 people now recycle.

However, 55% of households put items in the general rubbish bin that can be recycled. This, say Recycle Now, is where we need to ‘Step It Up’. We can all help fight climate change by recycling because recycling currently saves 18 million tonnes of CO2 every year, which is the same as taking 12 million cars off the road.

And if you’re at all unsure about how to recycle a specific item, remember that www.recycleright.org.uk can show you exactly what needs to go in the recycling bin where you live!

Craig Stephens, Campaign Manager for Recycle Now: “This year Recycle Week is focussed on how recycling can help fight climate change and how by recycling even better we can have a bigger impact on our environment. More and more of us are recycling, so the next step is to make sure we get our recycling right.”

For the second year running major brands are putting their support/backing behind the Week by donating to help fund it including: – Amazon, British Soft Drinks Association, Britvic, Coca-Cola, Coop, Danone, innocent drinks, Listerine, McDonald’s, The Natural Source Waters Association, Ocado, PepsiCo, Prevented Ocean Plastic, and Waitrose and Partners UK.

To find out more about Recycle Week www.recyclenow.org.uk/RecycleWeek

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Liverpool Half Marathon on SUNDAY 12th SEPTEMBER 2021

Liverpool Half Marathon on SUNDAY 12th SEPTEMBER 2021 – Restrictions to access at Otterspool Recycling Centre, Jericho Lane, Liverpool.

There will be some restrictions to the access at Otterspool Recycling Centre during the Liverpool Half Marathon on Sunday 12th September 2021.

Jericho Lane will be closed at the junction to Aigburth Road between 9.00am and – 12.00 noon, as runners pass from Sefton Park to Otterspool Park via the underpass and then across the top of Jericho Lane. The junction will be open as soon as the last runner passes into Otterspool Park.

To avoid disruption in the area during the road closure, please use Old Swan Recycling Centre, Cheadle Avenue, Old Swan, L13 3AF.
Alternatively please use Riverside Drive to access Otterspool Recycling Centre by proceeding along Aigburth Road, Park Road left into Parliament Street, left into Sefton Street.

For more detailed information on the half marathon and road closures on the 12th September 2021, please go to: www.btrliverpool.com

Download: Full Road Closure Event Leaflet

For your nearest Recycling Centre see here.

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Zero Waste Week 2021

At Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority we are delighted to support this year’s Zero Waste Week (6th to 10th September).

Founded in 2008, Zero Waste Week aims to help individuals, businesses, organisations, schools, universities and community groups reduce landfill waste, save money and preserve resources. It wants to:

– empower individuals to rethink ‘rubbish’ as a valuable resource
– encourage us all to make small changes that lead to more sustainable consumption patterns
– educate so that people can easily and effectively reduce landfill, save money and participate in the circular economy in line with the Global Goals for sustainable development.

For more information about Zero Waste Week please visit www.zerowasteweek.co.uk.

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Access to Otterspool and Old Swan Recycling Centres

Access to Otterspool and Old Swan Recycling Centres

Traffic to both Otterspool Recycling Centre and Old Swan Recycling Centre is currently being impacted by diversions.

Otterspool Recycling Centre – vehicles turning right from Aigburth Road into Jericho Lane, and vehicles going straight on from Ashfield Road into Jericho Lane will be diverted via Garston Way between 9.30am to 3.30pm, Monday 9th – Friday 13th August 2021.

Old Swan Recycling Centre – approached from Old Swan, Cheadle Avenue is accessed via Green Lane which is affected by the current Prescot Road closure. A diversion will sign you to West Derby Road where you can access Green Lane.

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NEWS: Halton Play Council get £8,000 funding for Make Use & Lend project

A Halton scheme to increase reuse and waste prevention is set to reach out to the local community after winning £8,000 funding.

The Make Use and Lend project will be based at the charity Halton Play Council’s Resource Centre on Mersey Road, Runcorn and aims:

• To increase the amounts of materials being re-used, repaired and loaned rather than thrown away or recycled. This will include textiles, plastics, paper, metal, wood, electrical/electronic items, cardboard and glass;

• To upgrade and update our Toy Library Service for use by the local community with toys and activities to suit all abilities and development needs including a range of resources for special educational nee. Learning through play supports children’s natural physical, cognitive, emotional and social development. This is even more important following the COVID- lockdowns to support positive physical and mental well-being.

• To address environmental impacts the toys we lend out will help to reduce the amounts of plastic and other materials going to waste.

• To provide craft workshops and swishing and sale events to help increase awareness and skills to recycle. re-use, repair and prevent waste.

The scheme was one of just 17 projects awarded funding from Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority/Veolia annual Community Fund and will run until the end of March 2022. The first big event will be a textile sale planned for the end of July at the Resource Centre.

Halton Play Council manager, Joyce Reilly said: “This project and our services play a key and positive role to support vulnerable children and families in Halton particularly as we recover from the impacts of the pandemic. This project will show we can do more as a local community to reduce the amount of materials we throw away, develop new skills and knowledge and demonstrate the value of volunteering.”

Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority Chairperson Cllr Tony Concepcion said: “Make Use and Lend Halton is a great idea and a worthy recipient of our Community Fund. It will keep textiles and clothes from going to waste, give other unwanted items a new lease of life, and – separate to the waste element – will show the benefits of play to vulnerable children.

“Giving groups like Halton Play Council the opportunity to look after the environment can bring benefits to all of us and can help appreciate items as valuable resources rather than something which might be just thrown away.”

Information on the project and events will be provided on the Halton Play Council social media and website: www.haltonplaycouncil.co.uk; Facebook: Halton Play Council Ltd; Twitter: haltonplayc

ENDS

Media enquiries to:

Stuart Donaldson, Halton Play Council Email: stuartwho1@live.co.uk Tel: 07882693249

Picture Caption: Volunteers outside Halton Play Council Resource Centre (Sally, Ian and Stuart)

Note to Editors
1. Halton Play Council was established in 1997 as a local independent charity which supports, delivers and champions free play for all children in Halton.
2. The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund supports community and voluntary sector groups, not for profit social enterprises and schools in Liverpool City Region.
3. MRWA operates (via a contract with Veolia) 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.
4. Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. It is a Statutory Authority that works with the local authorities in Merseyside and with Halton Borough Council and MRWA takes a lead in advocating waste prevention, re-use and recycling in the City Region.

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NEWS: Wirral youth in the zone to reduce, reuse and recycle!

A Wirral charity is using the enthusiasm and passion of young people to help stop perfectly good food from going to waste.

Based at The Hive on Bright Street, Birkenhead, Wirral Youth Zone has been running the Waste Not Want Not project for almost a year after receiving funding from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund in June 2020.

The project has been cutting food waste by giving young people the skills to cultivate and cook their own food and arming them with nutritional knowledge and know-how. Participants (aged 8-19) are being taught how to grow fresh ingredients, cook meals from scratch, and use up leftovers, all while keeping waste to a minimum.

An estimated 140,000 tonnes of food is wasted in the Liverpool City Region each year. A lot of this could still be used and would save the average family £720 a year in groceries. It is this behaviour the project is hoping to have an impact upon.

Stuart Barnes, CEO of Wirral Youth Zone, said: “We are providing young people who attend The Hive with the knowledge, skills and confidence to cook simple, healthy and well-balanced meals. Through our informal cooking sessions, we want to inspire young people to believe they can make a difference to their health and the environment through the choices they make with food.”

Waste Not Want Not’s mission is to prevent and reduce waste through teaching young people how to repurpose leftovers and be more sustainable in the kitchen. The training sessions demonstrate not only recipes from popular ‘to be binned’ ingredients but also how to recycle ingredients, what to do with leftovers and using alternatives to cling-film, minimising waste, water and eco-friendly cleaning materials. Throughout the 40-week project, young people have been receiving opportunities to visit supermarkets, Recycling Centres, community centres and allotments to learn about worldwide food and learn how to grow their own.

Stuart Barnes continued: “Participants have been learning about portion planning and portion sizes, shopping lists, food storage, understanding best before/use by dates, using leftovers and how food is grown. We want to ensure young people can cook healthy food on a budget, save money for their family and think about food and waste as a resource to be valued and not thrown away.”

Wirral Youth Zone received £7826 from the MRWA Community Fund to deliver the project, which has so far directly engaged with 240 young people. It is hoped that almost three tonnes of food waste will have been avoided at the end of the 40-weeks.

Carl Beer, Chief Executive of MRWA, said: “Food waste is a big issue with significant environmental effects. Projects like Waste Not Want Not can get people to recognise that the food they buy exists within a circular economy – from farm to fork – while having a real impact in reducing household food waste. Giving young people the skills to grow and cook their own food will last them a lifetime.”

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News to editors:

• Attached picture captions: The young participants in the Waste Not Want Not project by Wirral Youth Zone (PERMISSION HAS BEEN GIVEN TO USE THESE PHOTOGRAPHS).

• Wirral Youth Zone, named by young people as ‘The Hive’, is a purpose-built facility for young people aged 8 – 19, and up to 25 for those with disabilities. Completed in 2016, the Youth Zone offers a wide range of activities for young people aged between 8 and 19 (and up to age 25 for those with a disability), including; dance, sport fitness, music and media.

• Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

• The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 20/21 has seen 15 community groups from Merseyside and Halton share £150,000 to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions.

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NEWS: Mersey community groups secure £165,000 funding to help reduce waste

Seventeen community groups have been awarded a share of £165,000 to help the Liverpool City Region reduce, re-use and recycle more.

The money has come from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority and Veolia Community Fund 21/22 which helps to support local waste prevention, re-use and recycling initiatives.

The seventeen organisations had to bid for the funding which will give them the financial resources to deliver waste-reducing behavioural change projects across the region.

Programmes include cookery clubs to reduce food waste, community recycling hubs, sewing classes and craft clubs, upcycling and restoration of unwanted furniture, clothes recycling and a cloth nappy lending library*.

Project applications had to tackle one or more of the four priority household waste materials which have been identified by MRWA as key, namely Food, Plastics, Textiles and Furniture. An analysis of waste in the Liverpool City Region highlighted that a greater amount of these materials could be re-used or recycled. Projects can also include other household waste materials, for example paper, card, metals.

Chairperson of Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority (MRWA), Councillor Tony Concepcion, said: “There are a lot of communities concerned about climate change and sustainable living – giving groups the opportunity to look after the environment can bring benefits to all of us and can help appreciate items as valuable resources rather than something which might be just thrown away.

“Projects we have previously funded have continued to deliver benefits beyond the first year, through their legacy and ongoing impact on behavioural change, and in many cases through new or continuing activities.

“There has been some disruption with the Coronavirus pandemic but we’re confident that these projects will go ahead. I wish them all the best and look forward to seeing the impact they have.”

One organisation to receive funding is Carmel College in St Helens which has clinched £8000. The Catholic Sixth Form College also received Community Fund money in 2018 for its Foundation Learning Department’s Sensory Garden, which was created using reclaimed materials.

Lauren Molyneux, Foundation Learning Tutor at Carmel College, said: “Our previous project used the funding to create an amazing space in what was previously an overgrown patch of ground, using unwanted and reclaimed materials. This time round we’re holding workshops which will equip students with the skills to reuse and repurpose old and unwanted furniture and clothes, plus teaching them how to grow their own food. We’re looking forward to getting started!”

The successful organisations have got until March 2022 to deliver their projects.

ENDS

Note to editors

  • Image caption – launch of a previous Community Fund project Carmel College’s Sensory Garden, St Helens.
  • *The successful projects:

Big Help Project – No Waste Food Club: this will set up six new Community Food Partnerships to reduce food wastage, aiming for 200 new members per Partnership. Will also include access to other services such as debt advice, housing support, employability, skills training.

The Bread Streets Group – Waste Not, Want Not: this Liverpool-based project will hold six workshops on how to reduce and reuse food, plastics and clothes/textiles, plus a litter pick.

Bridge2 CIC – Reimagine: this project will see textiles and furniture collected and donated to support vulnerable communities, three furniture reuse courses and four textile reuse workshops.

Brunswick Youth & Community Centre – Make a Meal of it: this project in Sefton will host 10 weekly food skills training sessions with local families. They will be taught how to grow their own produce, use leftover, cook on a budget and how to freeze food correctly.

Carmel Sixth Form College – Sustainable Steps Toward Sustainability: the College will hold 26 weekly workshops and events for students on how to reuse furniture, textiles and food growing.

Centre 63 – Remake Yourself Hub: this ongoing programme will continue to provide sewing classes and upcycling furniture workshops while supporting the skill development of young women. It will concentrate on unwanted furniture and textiles and the Centre 63 youth club will be focused on litter picking, repair workshops and food waste activities.

Changing Communities CIC – ReStore St Helens: the reuse and recycle shop in Sutton will host a series of furniture upcycling workshops, offer donations to local vulnerable residents and set up seven school reading corners.

Community Integrated Care – Sustainability in Social Care: CIC will establish five new community collection hubs, host waste reduction and re-use events (for example, textile & furniture swapping and food waste avoidance workshops) and look to reuse materials within the social care sector. They will also create a full-time waste prevention specialist and part-time food waste avoidance champion while supporting 20 volunteers, giving opportunities for people with care and support needs.

Dovecot and Princess Drive Community Association – Recycle, Refashion, ReCreate: includes clothes/textiles and food workshops to be held in local schools, five family food workshops, 13 sewing in the community sessions, seven re-fashioning sessions and a fashion show and recycling competition.

Farm Urban – Future Food Heroes: working with six primary schools this project will set up a food ecosystem in each class and help create future food ambassadors.

Halton Play Council – Make Use and Lend Halton: the Runcorn-based charity will use the funding to host 10 reuse & repair craft workshops, four swishing and textiles sales events, as well as collecting textiles for redistribution and a toy lending library.

Liverpool Cloth Nappy Library – Sustainable Starts: will look to reduce plastic pollution through a lending library which will provide a reusable nappy kit and advice to parents. Will look to engage with 50 families as well as host three community pop-up events.

Liverpool Lighthouse – Liverpool Re-Fashion: this will see 26 weekly refashioning workshops help, three enterprise workshops and an exhibition at a fashion show.

Liverpool World Centre – Fashion Fix: a clothes/textiles project for schools, trainee teachers and parents, engaging with 4,000 people. LWC will create 20 Fashion Fixers and Climate Champions to help raise awareness and influence reuse, recycling of textiles and reduction of textile waste.

Make It Happen Birkenhead Ltd – Textiles as treasure: Make It Happen will employ a Textiles Champion to help establish a Community Shop, host 22 training sessions in sewing and crafts and sell the items in the shop.

Pioneer People Wirral – Street Ahead: this scheme will host a variety of neighbourhood exchange/garage sale events and 12 community centre events with donated items and upcycled items made by the Shed Heads project. Will also offer bikes refurbished at Liverpool Prison and send tools and clothes to Gambia to support local enterprise.

Wirral Change Ltd – Repaired Again: this project will work with ethnic communities to hold 20 food waste workshops, 20 textiles upcycling sewing classes and three community events.

  • Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.
  • MRWA operates (via a contract with resource management company Veolia) 14 Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRC’s) for householders in the Merseyside area wishing to recycle and dispose of their own waste.
  • The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 2021/22 has seen 17 community groups from Merseyside and Halton receive a funding boost to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions. Funding total is £164,999.38. https://www.merseysidewda.gov.uk/what-we-do/supporting-residents-and-community-groups/community-fund-past-successes/

Members of the media for more information please contact:

John Lally
Marketing and Communications Officer
Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority
Direct Dial: 0151 255 2568
John.lally@merseysidewda.gov.uk
General enquiries: 0151 255 1444

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NEWS: Schools rise to the ten-tonne textiles reuse challenge

A project aiming to cut the amount of clothes and textiles going to waste has recently celebrated a significant funding boost.

Toxteth-based education organisation Liverpool World Centre has received £18,000 from the Merseyside Recycling & Waste Authority (MRWA) and Veolia Community Fund to run waste prevention project the Ten Tonne Challenge.

The scheme – being delivered in partnership with environmental charity Faiths4Change – is engaging with local schools and universities via workshops, talks and surveys to raise awareness of and help reduce clothes and textiles waste.

An estimated 18,000 tonnes of textiles are discarded from households each year in the Liverpool City Region, a lot of which could still be used. It is this behaviour the project is hoping to change and itself will look to stop over ten tonnes of material from going to waste.

Pablo Guidi, Director at Liverpool World Centre, said: “The whole project will connect children and adults to environmental issues. The educational activities will highlight the life cycle of textiles, including the production and disposal of clothing, delivered through teacher training, assemblies and student workshops.”

Liverpool World Centre launched the project in December with a secondary schools Climate Conference which involved students identifying their own climate actions. Training workshops in textile waste management are being delivered to 35 schools, plus assemblies to schools who either haven’t engaged with environmental work or are in areas of low recycling performance. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and Lockdown, several teacher training sessions have been successfully delivered digitally.

Pablo Guidi continued: “There has been an increased pupil participation in climate change activities. We think that by working with school councils we can encourage pupils to direct their actions in a positive way. The focus on raising awareness that all textiles can go for reuse or recycling will help give children a belief that the climate emergency can be tackled.”

Carl Beer, Chief Executive of MRWA, said: “Our research shows that there are high quantities of textiles – such as clothes, carpets, curtains – placed in recycling and household waste bins across kerbside collections in the Liverpool City Region. However, textiles shouldn’t go into bins. Instead, Recycling Centres, charities, local bring banks all accept clothes and textiles where they will go on to be recycled or reused.”

All schools involved are being encouraged to take part in a series of activities to showcase their learning about the textile journey, such as fundraising (through www.recycle4school.org.uk), Pop Up Boutiques, swap shops, technology (such as building scarecrows) and arts and crafts.

One student involved in the project is Grace Harrison, studying at Liverpool Hope University, who said: “I think that the 10 Tonne challenge is a great educational project, not only is it super fun for the children to get involved in but it is also vital environmentally changing information being passed onto the next generation. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my time participating in the project, as not only have I learnt a lot but I’ve loved seeing young people engaged in the project.”

By the end of the project it is hoped that up to 60 schools will have engaged in waste education activities, 680 schools will have received a textiles and clothes waste fact sheet, and trainee teachers at two universities will have delivered sub-projects on waste and the environment.

Carl Beer of MRWA, continued: “Textiles waste is a big issue with a significant environmental impact – however, projects like the Ten Tonne Challenge can help have a real positive influence to see that waste reduced.”

Ends

News to editors:
• The attached pictures show: Pupils at St Mary’s and St Paul’s C of E Primary School in Prescot with their Ten Tonne Challenge textiles crafts.

• Merseyside Recycling and Waste Authority is responsible for the disposal of municipal waste on Merseyside. Established in 1986 following the abolition of Merseyside County Council, it is a statutory Authority that works with all the local authorities on Merseyside – Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral. MRWA takes a lead in advocating recycling, waste minimisation and safe and effective disposal of waste for Merseyside residents.

• Liverpool World Centre (LWC) is a Development Education Centre which works with communities, educators, schools, charities, businesses and pupils across the region and beyond to make world issues relevant to the lives of young people.

• The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund has contributed £18,070 to a total budget of £25,670.

• The MRWA and Veolia Community Fund 20/21 has seen 15 community groups from Merseyside and Halton share £150,000 to help make the region a cleaner and greener place. The financial support will see the groups help reduce household waste, encourage recycling and resource re-use, and prevent carbon emissions.