K – O


K L M N O
Kitchen waste
Landfill sites
Licensing
Lightbulbs
Litter
Magazines
Mattresses
Medicine
Metal
Milk
Mobile phones
Nappies
Newspapers
Oil
Office paper

Kitchen waste

Some local councils now provide facilities for collecting kitchen waste in their kerbside collection. If yours does not, you can put it in a home composter to make compost. However cooked food or meat products should be composted in a womery. See composting for more advice. Instead of throwing away food, think about using up leftovers to create something new, or try and buy less in the first place. www.recycleformerseyside.com is full of ideas for leftover recipes.

Landfill sites

For further information on the closed landfill sites MRWA is responsible for please see the following link. MRWA does not operate any open landfill sites.

Enquiries concerning the disposal of commercial or industrial waste should be directed to the nearest landfill site where they will be able to quote for the disposal of such waste.

Licensing

Licensing information for waste is available from the Environment Agency (www.environment-agency.gov.uk / Tel: 0370 850 6506) for waste sites and waste operations.

Light bulbs

All lightbulbs can be recycled at all Merseyside Household Waste Recycling Centres. Try and buy energy efficient/saving light bulbs, especially for places where you leave the lights on for long periods. These will last much longer than a standard light bulb and use much less energy, saving you money in the long run.

Litter

Litter breeds litter and it costs Local Authorities thousands of pounds a year to deal with it. The ‘Keep Britain Tidy’ group has worked long and hard to clean up streets blighted by litter. Check out current campaigns on www.keepbritaintidy.org.

Magazines (see also Paper and Junk mail)

Think about donating old magazines to your local Doctor or Dentist Surgery. If not always recycle them. Magazines can be recycled at all of Merseyside’s Household Waste Recycling Centres, with your kerbside collection or at paper bring banks across Merseyside.

Mattresses

Mattresses can be taken to all of Merseyside’s Household Waste Recycling Centres.

Medicine

Most unwanted medicine can be returned to pharmacies and chemists. Old medicine bottles can be returned to Boots stores and clean, empty bottles can be recycled at all of Merseyside’s Household Waste Recycling Centres, with your kerbside collection or at bottle banks across Merseyside.

Metal

Many metals can be re-used by the scrap metal industry. If you have a large amount it will be worthwhile taking it directly to a scrap metal merchant, see a telephone directory or search online for local dealers. Alternatively, metal can be recycled at all of Merseyside’s Household Waste Recycling Centres.

Milk bottles

Try and buy your milk in returnable glass bottles and make sure that you return them to the milkman. On average the glass milk bottles used by the milkmen are reused 24 times. This saves energy and resources each time they are returned to the milkman. Please do not take them to a Household Waste Recycling Centre and don’t place in your kerbside container or in a ‘bottle bank’.

Mobile phones

All small electrical items can be taken to your local Household Waste Recycling Centre. There are several companies who pay for mobile phones, and some charities take phones also.

Nappies

Disposable nappies can take hundreds of years to break down in landfill sites. If you have to use disposable nappies choose ones that are dioxin free and/or unbleached. This should be marked on the packaging. A better alternative is to use cotton or terry towelling “real” nappies which can be reused over and over again – see our real nappy page for more information.

Newspapers (see also Paper)

Newspapers can be recycled at all of Merseyside’s Household Waste Recycling Centres, with your local Council’s kerbside collection service or at bring banks across Merseyside.

Oil

Pouring any oil down the drain is not only illegal but also harmful to humans and the environment. A lot of surface water drains lead to the nearest stream and oil may cause pollution, affect aquatic life and contaminate water supplies. It is also harmful to put oil in soil or sewers.

Motor oil and cooking oil can be recycled at all Household waste Recycling Centres. If you have large amounts of oil it is best to contact a specialist organisation – see your phone listings for local operators.

Office paper

See Paper and confidential waste.